President's Corner

What I'm Up To Paul LeBlanc

reading
I'm reading:

I just started Children of Ash and Elm, a very readable and fascinating history of the Vikings,by Neil Price. Ninety percent of what I thought I knew about the Vikings is wrong, thus far. Best of all, on almost every page I have a “Really?!” moment (causing me to yet again interrupt Pat’s reading to share my wonder). These have included a Norse god that travelled in a wagon pulled by cats – an image I find endlessly amusing; a three-year period in the 500s when the earth was enveloped in volcanic ash, summers did not happen, food sources disappeared, and half the population was wiped out (why did I miss this?); and the fact that Vikings were not the hairy barbarians often depicted, but rather fastidious and fancy dressers who loved ornamentation and jewelry. As bloodthirsty and violent as we all thinkthey were, but much better dressed when hacking away at enemies and pillaging villages. How great is this stuff?

watching
I'm watching:

We finally finished The Americans, a series I completely missed when it first came out. I loved it and it brought back memories of two epic trips across the then Soviet Union I took back in 1981 and 1983 (including five days on the Trans-Siberian Railroad), the time in which the series is set. I reached out to the show’s creator, Joe Weisberg, and we chatted last week. He agreed to visit next fall and to do a discussion of the series and his forthcoming book on the Soviet Union and Russia.

listening
I'm listening to:

Adrian Haugabrook is guiding me through an introduction to jazz, a genre that I just never embraced. From Miles to Coltrane to Brubeck, I am really enjoying it for the first time. I tweeted something about my newfound interest and jazz fans came out of the woodwork. It’s fun to be a newbie in an area with such devoted followers, all eager to share their recommendations. By the way, only doing this on vinyl — it just seems right.

 

tweeting
I'm tweeting at @snhuprez:

Pop Picks

Pop Picks – February 10, 2021

Posted on February 10, 2021

What I’m reading: I just started Children of Ash and Elm, a very readable and fascinating history of the Vikings,by Neil Price. Ninety percent of what I thought I knew about the Vikings is wrong, thus far. Best of all, on almost every page I have a “Really?!” moment (causing me to yet again interrupt Pat’s […]

Read More »
A President's Reflections

What SNHU’s Global Education Movement students have taught us about online learning in the most difficult of circumstances

Posted on January 24, 2021

In the last year, COVID-19 has drastically reshaped all of our lives—how we work, shop, visit with friends and family and, of course, how we go to school.  As one of the fastest growing universities in the nation — with 160,000 online learners and 3,000 on-campus students — SNHU was uniquely suited to tackle the […]

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A President's Reflections

An Assault on Our Democracy

Posted on January 7, 2021

Yesterday was a dark day in our country’s history. Over the years, there have been presidential election outcomes I have found bitterly disappointing while others rejoiced. In other election years, I celebrated and others were crestfallen. In every instance, those who supported the winning candidate and those whose candidate lost were certain of one thing: […]

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Pop Picks

Pop Picks – January 2, 2021

Posted on January 2, 2021

What I’m reading: Once in a while, there comes along a book that is so breathtakingly good that it saddens one to near its end. Patrick Radden Keefe’s Say Nothing, the story of the “Troubles” in Northern Ireland and the murder of a mother of ten, is one such book. It’s about that murder, but so much more, […]

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A President's Reflections

2020: A Year We’ll Never Forget

Posted on December 23, 2020

As we approach the end of 2020, I am reminded that the holidays are also a time to pause and take stock of that for which we are grateful, even in a challenging year like this one. High on my list is the SNHU community. Throughout the year we accomplished so much together, including accelerating […]

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A President's Reflections

Asking Better Questions

Posted on October 12, 2020

Learning is an act of humility. In my experience, our best learning often comes when we are at our worst, when we have been most humbled. I’ve often learned more in my stumbles than in my victories and there was some hubris in every instance. Whether our foray into China, launching a start-up, or rapid […]

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Pop Picks

Pop Picks – October 12, 2020

Posted on October 12, 2020

What I’m reading: Two related books: Humanocracy, a new book by Gary Hamel and Michele Zanini, and Bureaucracy: What Government Agencies Do and Why They Do It, a 1989 book by James Q. Wilson. They offer very different explorations of how organizational bureaucracies work and how they might work differently and better (the Wilson book) or be reconceived […]

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Pop Picks

Pop Picks – June 15, 2020

Posted on June 15, 2020

What I’m reading:  I am almost in despair for the way the pandemic has reduced my reading time, some combination of longer days, lack of plane time, and mental distraction, I think. However, I just finished Marguerite Yourcenar’s magisterial Memoirs of Hadrian, a historical novel, though I hesitate to call it that because A) she would likely reject […]

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SNHU News

The Decision to Stay with Remote Study and Work: A Deeper Dive

Posted on June 12, 2020

Our announcement this week that we will not bring students and employees back to campus in September has predictably disappointed a lot of people and I’ve received lots of messages from students and parents. A number of students have asked for a more detailed explanation, something I’m happy to do. While our communications outlined our reasoning, let […]

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A President's Reflections

Steps to Offer Hope and Empowerment: A Message to the SNHU Community

Posted on June 1, 2020

MEMO To: SNHU Community From: Paul LeBlanc Date: June 1, 2020 Subject: Steps to Offer Hope and Empowerment I have written to you after other events that have shocked our collective conscience – white nationalist violence in Charlottesville, the shootings at the Pulse nightclub, the school shootings in Parkland. With each of those terrible incidents, we felt […]

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