President's Corner

What I'm Up To Paul LeBlanc

reading
I'm reading:

Maggie O’Farrell’s Hamnet is stunningly good. And searing in parts, as it goes deep into the grief of losing a child in ways that are almost unbearable to read, unimaginable as it is to any parent. It’s also the intimate story of Agnes, Shakespeare’s wife (he is actually a secondary character), their marriage, family, and journey. O’Farrell captures the 16th Century Elizabethan world in a way that transports the reader and makes that place and time familiar and strange at once, as all other human times and places must be. Her one chapter digression on how the bubonic plague travels by ship and by fleas from Venice to Stratford-Upon-Avon is mesmerizing and timely, as we deal with our own plague of coronavirus. I couldn’t put it down.

watching
I'm watching:

I almost never post about art I do not like. Some of that comes from an innate respect for artists and how hard is their work. Some of it from simply wanting to celebrate how much good art is being produced today (it’s remarkable really: maybe dysfunctional times make for better art). But I have to warn you about the film Licorice Pizza, Paul Thomas Anderson’s recent rom-com, growing up story set in 1970s LA. Critics really like this movie and I HAVE NO IDEA WHY. It churns along in search of a plot, Alana Haim’s character seems clueless, and the romance between a 25-year-old and a 15-year-old just feels creepy wrong in this day and age. Reverse the genders and there’d be an outcry. We stuck it out to the end, like a root canal, because we felt some obligation to see if they might eventually pull it out and redeem this thing, but we just wanted our money and time back by the time the credits rolled. If you like this film, please email me and tell me why.

listening
I'm listening to:

This one is rather odd, I know. But I’ve been captivated by the videos of musicians in Ukraine, playing Classical pieces in bomb shelters, amid the wreckage, or at the Polish border as refugees escape the war. Here are just three examples:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l897OTRsLxo

https://www.nbcnews.com/video/man-plays-cello-amid-destruction-in-ukraine-136281157849

https://www.newsflare.com/video/481839/piano-player-plays-music-at-the-border-between-ukraine-and-poland

They are unspeakably sad and uplifting at the same time, expressing a “terrible beauty,” to borrow from Yeats.

 

tweeting
I'm tweeting at @snhuprez:

Pop Picks

Pop Picks – April 25, 2022

Posted on April 25, 2022

What I’m reading Maggie O’Farrell’s Hamnet is stunningly good. And searing in parts, as it goes deep into the grief of losing a child in ways that are almost unbearable to read, unimaginable as it is to any parent. It’s also the intimate story of Agnes, Shakespeare’s wife (he is actually a secondary character), their marriage, family, and journey. […]

Read More »
Pop Picks

Pop Picks – February 28, 2022

Posted on February 28, 2022

What I’m reading Just finished Laura Spinney’s 2017 Pale Rider: The Spanish Flu of 1918 and How It Changed The World. Reading about a pandemic that killed more than 50 million people may sound like the last thing one wants to do given the last two years, but we need to start making sense of […]

Read More »
Pop Picks

Pop Picks – January 10, 2022

Posted on January 10, 2022

What I’m reading: The minute it came out, I bought Colson Whitehead’s Harlem Shuffle and cancelled all plans to read it in almost one sitting. I’d read a catalog if he wrote it. Set in Harlem in the 1960s, it’s the story of Ray Carney, owner of a furniture store trying to achieve the American dream for his family, […]

Read More »
A President's Reflections

A Look Back at 2021: Stronger Together

Posted on December 22, 2021

As I look back on 2021 this holiday season, I continue to be amazed by our students, staff, and faculty. Over the pandemic, we have seen first-hand the strength and resilience of the SNHU community. Despite the challenges of COVID-19, remote work and learning, and the ever-changing higher education landscape, our community did not skip […]

Read More »
A President's Reflections

Celebrating Commencement & Staff Graduates

Posted on November 15, 2021

This past weekend, we were finally able to celebrate our 2020 and 2021 online graduates across five powerful and inspiring ceremonies. The SNHU Arena was filled with incredible student stories: A 67-year-old grandmother who finished a degree she started in 1972, when I was still in high school. A woman holding her three-week-old infant. A […]

Read More »
SNHU News

SNHU Welcomes Three Trustees to the SNHU Community

Posted on October 13, 2021

Today, I’m excited to welcome three new Trustees to the SNHU community, who join us with impressive and diverse backgrounds and skill sets. In keeping with our commitment to increase and maintain diversity on the Board of Trustees, these new members bring experience in investment, finance, and technology leadership.   R. Grady Burnett has been a leader and innovator in technology, philanthropy and sports and has […]

Read More »
A President's Reflections

Remembering 9/11 Through Reflections from President Emeritus Dick Gustafson

Posted on September 10, 2021

September 11 was one of the worst days in our nation’s history, and the anniversary takes many of us back to the moment we first heard the news. We all have our own recollection, whether it was witnessing it firsthand, watching it through a television screen, or hearing the news from a loved one, friend, […]

Read More »
SNHU News

Celebrating World Refugee Day

Posted on June 17, 2021

Each year, SNHU celebrates World Refugee Day, an international event organized by the United Nations to celebrate refugees and displaced people, to raise awareness of their perseverance, and to recognize how we can all help protect their human rights.  For the SNHU community and for me, this day is deeply personal. SNHU launched the Global Education […]

Read More »
A President's Reflections

Reflections on George Floyd One Day Later

Posted on April 21, 2021

Like so many others, I was glued to the television late yesterday afternoon, waiting for the jury to return its verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial. It was an enormous relief to see George Floyd’s murderer convicted on all counts. There was finally accountability, a sense that justice had been served, and some reassurance that […]

Read More »
A President's Reflections

Standing With the Asian Community

Posted on March 18, 2021

I despair that I have write to you once again in the wake of a senseless and hate-filled murder of innocent fellow Americans. This time it was the killing of eight people in Georgia, six of them of Asian descent. This heinous act is part of an alarming and dramatic increase in violent attacks on Asians, Pacific Islanders, and […]

Read More »
Loading